Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

Universal Declaration On Human Rights


Adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1948


PREAMBLE


Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world,

Whereas disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people,


Whereas it is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression, that human rights should be protected by the rule of law,


Whereas it is essential to promote the development of friendly relations between nations,


Whereas the peoples of the United Nations have in the Charter reaffirmed their faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women and have determined to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom,


Whereas Member States have pledged themselves to achieve, in co-operation with the United Nations, the promotion of universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms,


Whereas a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the greatest importance for the full realization of this pledge,


Now, Therefore THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY proclaims THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among the peoples of Member States themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.


Article 1

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2

Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.

Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

Article 3

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and the security of person.

Article 4

No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

Article 5

No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Article 6

Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Article 7

All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law.

Article 8

Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

Article 9

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Article 10

Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair, and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

Article 11

Everyone charged with a penal offence has the right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees necessary for his defence. No one shall be held guilty of any penal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offence, under national or international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed.

Article 12

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation.

Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

Article 13

Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each State. Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.

Article 14

Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution. This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 15

Everyone has the right to a nationality. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

Article 16

Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.

Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses. The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

Article 17

Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

Article 18

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

Article 19

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas thorugh any media and regardless of frontiers.

Article 20

Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association. No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

Article 21

Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.

Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.

The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

Article 22

Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

Article 23

Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment. Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.

Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection. Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

Article 24

Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

Article 25

Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.

Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the same social protection.

Article 26

Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental states. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.

Education shall be direct to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace. Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

Article 27

Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits. Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

Article 28

Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

Article 29

Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full development of his personality is possible. In the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in a democratic society. These rights and freedoms may in no case be exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

Article 30

Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.

CCHR

by

The Citizens Commission on Human Rights

All great organisations set forth codes by which they align their purposes and activities. The Mental Health Declaration of Human Rights articulates the guiding principles of CCHR and the standards against which human rights violations within the field of mental health are relentlessly investigated and exposed.

A. No person shall be given psychiatric or psychological treatment against his or her will.

B. No person, man, woman or child, may be denied his or her personal liberty by reason of mental illness, so-called, without a fair jury trial by laymen and with proper legal representation.

C. No person shall be admitted to or held in a psychiatric institution, hospital or facility because of their religious, political or cultural beliefs and practices.

D. Any patient has:

1. The right to be treated with dignity as a human being;

2. The right to hospital amenities without distinction as to race, colour, sex, language, religion, political opinion, social origin or status by right of birth or property.

3. The right to have a thorough, physical and clinical examination by a competent registered general practitioner of one's choice, to ensure that one's mental condition is not caused by any undetected and untreated physical illness, injury or defect, and the right to seek a second medical opinion of one's choice.

4. The right to fully equipped medical facilities and appropriately trained medical staff in hospitals, so that competent physical, clinical examinations can be performed.

5. The right to choose the kind or type of therapy to be employed, and the right to discuss this with a general practitioner, healer or minister of one's choice.

6. The right to have all the side effects of any offered treatment made clear and understandable to the patient, in written form and in the patient's native language.

7. The right to accept or refuse treatment but in particular, the right to refuse sterilisation, electroshock treatment, insulin shock, lobotomy (or any other psychosurgical brain operation), aversion therapy, narcotherapy, deep sleep therapy and any drugs producing unwanted side effects.

8. The right to make official complaints, without reprisal, to an independent board which is composed of non-psychiatric personnel, lawyers and lay people. Complaints may encompass any torturous, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment received while under psychiatric care.

9. The right to have private counsel with a legal advisor and to take legal action.

10. The right to discharge oneself at any time and to be discharged without restriction, having committed no offence.

11. The right to manage one's own property and affairs with a legal advisor, if necessary, or if deemed incompetent by a court of law, to have a State appointed executor to manage such until one is adjudicated competent. Such executor is accountable to the patient's next of kin, or legal advisor or guardian.

12. The right to see and possess one's hospital records and to take legal action with regard to any false information contained therein which may be damaging to one's reputation.

13. The right to take criminal action, with the full assistance of law enforcement agents, against any psychiatrist, psychologist or hospital staff for any abuse, false imprisonment, assault from treatment, sexual abuse or rape, or any violation of mental health or other law. And the right to a mental health law that does not indemnify or modify the penalties for criminal, abusive or negligent treatment of patients committed by any psychiatrist, psychologist or hospital staff.

14. The right to sue psychiatrists, their associations and colleges, the institution, or staff for unlawful detention, false reports, or damaging treatment.

15. The right to work or to refuse to work, and the right to receive just compensation on a pay-scale comparable to union or state/national wages for similar work, for any work performed while hospitalised.

16. The right to education or training so as to enable one better to earn a living when discharged, the right of choice over what kind of education or training is received.

17. The right to receive visitors and a minister of one's own faith.

18. The right to make and receive telephone calls and the right to privacy with regard to all personal correspondence to and from anyone.

19. The right to freely associate or not with any group or person in a psychiatric institution, hospital or facility.

20. The right to a safe environment without having in the environment, persons placed there for criminal reasons.

21. The right to be with others of one's own age group.

22. The right to wear personal clothing, to have personal effects and to have a secure place in which to keep them.

23. The right to daily physical exercise in the open.

24. The right to a proper diet and nutrition and to three meals a day.

25. The right to hygienic conditions and non-overcrowded facilities, and to sufficient, undisturbed leisure and rest.

November 2006

Provisionally placing staff on Pova list is incompatible with human rights law


The system for provisionally listing care staff on the Protection of Vulnerable Adults list was deemed incompatible with human rights law in a ruling yesterday.


Posted: 17 November 2006 | Full Article


Government U-turn on human rights vow to clients of private providers


The government has "seriously diluted" its commitment to ensuring that clients of independent care agencies are protected under the Human Rights Act 1998 it was claimed this week.


Posted: 15 November 2006 | Full Article

October 2006

Children's rights director challenges breaking up of out-of-authority placements


Nine out of 10 decisions to bring a child back from an out-of-authority placement are reversed following intervention from the office of the Children’s Rights Director, delegates at Community Care Live Children & Families were told today.


Posted: 12 October 2006 | Full Article

September 2006


Home Office takes blame for death


The Home Office appears to have finally accepted responsibility for the death of 18-year-old Sarah Campbell in Styal women’s prison in 2003.


Posted: 28 September 2006 | Full Article


More pensioners suffer as council tax bites harder


Click on the above headline for more social care related articles from today's national newspapers.


Posted: 28 September 2006 | Full Article


UN convention for disabled people: special report


The first new human rights treaty of the 21st century, agreed last week by the United Nations in New York, seeks to promote the rights of the world’s 650 million disabled people.


Posted: 01 September 2006 | Full Article


August 2006


Disabled people's rights enshrined in United Nations treaty


The United Nations has agreed a new treaty to protect the rights of disabled people.


Posted: 29 August 2006 | Full Article


Disability Discrimination Bill


When the Disability Discrimination Bill was published in the House of Lords in November, 2004, the government claimed that the new legislation to improve the rights of disabled people would make challenging discrimination much easier.


Posted: 10 August 2006 | Full Article


July 2006


Private care providers not subject to Human Rights Act


Older people’s charities, human rights activists and ministers had their hopes of making independent care providers subject to the Human Rights Act 1998 dashed earlier this week in a High Court ruling in a test case.


Posted: 14 July 2006 | Full Article


June 2006


Is it right to screen embryos for disabilities


Medical technology now allows for the screening of embryos for disabilities, giving parents the option of termination at a very early stage. Is this desirable? Anabel Unity Sale reports


Posted: 29 June 2006 | Full Article


Gillian Dalley's Relatives and Residents Association is looking to gain Human Rights Act coverage for care home residents

The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Bill, currently going through parliament, will ensure people applying to work with vulnerable adults in health and social care will be vetted and those deemed unsuitable barred.


Posted: 26 June 2006 | Full Article


Self-funding care home residents are unprotected by the Human Rights Act


Self-funding care home residents are particularly vulnerable to abuse because they are unprotected by the Human Rights Act and their plight often goes unnoticed, a charity has said.


Posted: 12 June 2006 | Full Article


No right in rushed plan


Our exclusive story this week on developments following the landmark Bournewood case raises some fundamental human rights issues.


Posted: 12 June 2006 | Full Article


Human rights laws are no aid to users


The potential for human rights principles to improve older people's services is not being fulfilled because of ignorance among service providers and suspicion among older people, according to a report published this week.


Posted: 12 June 2006 | Full Article


Human rights principles are not improving older people's lives


The potential for human rights principles to improve older people’s services is not being fulfilled due to ignorance about them among service providers and suspicion among older people, a report out today says.


Posted: 07 June 2006 | Full Article


May 2006


The Big Question


Is the Not Dead Yet UK campaign by disabled people right to oppose assisted dying legislation?


Posted: 18 May 2006 | Full Article


Havering care home plans ‘breach rights’


The government has entered a High Court battle over Havering Council’s plans to transfer two care homes to the private sector because it could affect the sale of public services to private operators.


Posted: 18 May 2006 | Full Article


April 2006


Refugees rights threatened by 'asylum fatigue'


Refugees’ rights to international protection are being threatened by “asylum fatigue” in many countries, according to a UN report published tod


Posted: 19 April 2006 | Full Article


Research into practice


How likely are practitioners to breach their code of confidentiality? Research carried out by Florence Watson 

suggests it happens routinely.


Posted: 12 April 2006 | Full Article


Research into practice


Bernard Moss looks at a survey of US students on the role of religion and spirituality, and considers implications for UK social work education.


Posted: 11 April 2006 | Full Article


Research into practice


Eric Blyth on donor-conceived people's views about their genetic origins and implications for policy and practice.


Posted: 11 April 2006 | Full Article


March 2006


Possible breach of human rights as carers' lives are blighted by inadequate support


Many of the UK's six million carers do not get the support they are entitled to. The result appears to be failing health and a lack of social contact. Maria Ahmed reports


Posted: 23 March 2006 | Full Article

Who to turn to now?

The closure of three advice services has made life harder for staff and service users, writes Gary Vaux

Posted: 16 March 2006 | Full Article

Councils 'failing on human rights'

Councils may face legal challenges because they could be violating carers' human rights, a report published this week warns.

Posted: 16 March 2006 | Full Article

February 2006

Mother fails to win judicial review of controversial asylum legislation

A woman has failed in her bid to seek a judicial review of the legislation that can lead to the children of failed asylum seekers being taken into care, in the first High Court challenge to the law.

Posted: 02 February 2006 | Full Article

Social workers unite to fight section nine

Social workers have pledged to build a national campaign against implementation of section nine and other legislation that makes asylum seekers destitute or violates their human rights.

Posted: 02 February 2006 | Full Article

January 2006

Under a cloud

Health and social care workers are excluded from the protection other workers have from secondary smoking because their workplace is someone else’s home or exempt from proposed legislation. Is this fair, asks Katie Leason

Posted: 26 January 2006 | Full Article

Disability Discrimination Bill

When the Disability Discrimination Bill was published in the House of Lords in November, 2004, the government claimed that the new legislation to improve the rights of disabled people would make challenging discrimination much easier.

Posted: 23 January 2006 | Full Article

'Give workers right to smoke-free zone'

Home care workers should have the right to refuse to enter premises where residents are smoking, MPs say.

Posted: 05 January 2006 | Full Article

2005

The London Child Protection Committee’s interim protocol for professionals working with sexually active young people is likely to breach the European Convention on Human Rights, a leading human rights lawyer said this week.

Posted: 14 December 2005 | Full Article

Government record on children's rights found wanting


The government has only made “significant” progress on just 16 out of 78 recommendations issued by the United Nations committee on the rights of the child, a report reveals this week.


Posted: 25 November 2005 | Full Article


Alliance slams treatment of asylum seekers and young offenders


Painful restraint techniques were used on children on 768 occasions in secure training centres over the past year, according to figures collected by the Children's Rights Alliance for England.


Posted: 22 November 2005 | Full Article


Child Welfare: Historical Dimensions, Contemporary Debate


By Harry Hendrick.


Posted: 18 November 2005 | Full Article


Children's Rights and Power


By Mary John.


Posted: 18 November 2005 | Full Article


Social Work and Human Rights: A Foundation for Policy and Practice


By Elisabeth Reichert.


Posted: 08 November 2005 | Full Article

Why I love my job - Dr Charlotte Chapman


Dr Charlotte Chapman is a doctor at the Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture, an organisation for the rehabilitation of survivors of torture and organised violence.


Posted: 04 November 2005 | Full Article


Nothing Less Than Equality and Human Rights


Over the last four years or so, there has been gradually increasing recognition that age discrimination is at the root of many of the difficulties that older people experience. Of course we know there are problems – that many needs are not being met, that older people may not have equal access to universal services, that the quality of older people’s services often leaves a lot to be desired, that they do not always get the treatment they need from the NHS and that it is difficult for older people to get heard. But it is only relatively recently that we have begun to understand that age discrimination is the common thread running through these problems.


Posted: 26 October 2005 | Full Article


Hilton Dawson Blog


Hilton Dawson's Blog Hilton Dawson Hilton Dawson emerged from parliament on May 5th after serving eight years as the MP for Lancaster & Wyre with the avowed intention of resuming social work and taking part in the transformation of children’s services on the ground. Dawson, a former social worker, currently works for Voting for Children - the Human Rights organisation which recognises that adults have political power and children have none. T


Posted: 03 October 2005 | Full Article


Ugandan women hunger strike claim


Ugandan women at three immigration centres have started hunger strikes in protest at the prospect of being returned to the war-torn country, a charity has claimed.


Posted: 04 August 2005 | Full Article


Man on hunger strike handcuffed


A Zimbabwean asylum seeker who could not stand unaided was handcuffed on a journey from an immigration detention centre to hospital against the advice of his doctor, it is claimed.


Posted: 04 August 2005 | Full Article


Service outsourcing 'puts lives at risk'


Service outsourcing 'puts lives at risk' The lives of older people are being put at risk by systemic breaches of human rights in the social care system, a report claims.


Posted: 04 August 2005 | Full Article


Lives of older people put at risk


The lives of older people are being put at risk by systemic breaches of human rights in the social care system, according to a report this week, writes Helen McCormack .


Posted: 03 August 2005 | Full Article


Burke to take case to House of Lords


The disabled patient who lost his battle to prove guidelines for doctors on withdrawing treatment for the incapacitated are unlawful plans to take his case to the House of Lords, writes Helen McCormack .


Posted: 03 August 2005 | Full Article


Asylum seekers stage hunger strike


Ugandan women at three asylum detention centres have begun hunger strikes, demanding the government review its assessment of conditions in the war-torn country, a charity has claimed, writes Helen McCormack .


Posted: 02 August 2005 | Full Article


Director denies funding bias claim


A social services director has rebuffed claims that authorities are discriminating against older people in the funding of social care.


Posted: 28 July 2005 | Full Article


Prisons watchdog calls for probe on staff's treatment of detainees


Immigration authorities should examine the manner in which people are detained and removed from the UK, the prisons and probation ombudsman has recommended, writes Amy Taylor .


Posted: 28 July 2005 | Full Article


'Humiliated and degraded' in the name of treatment


Campaigners fear the draft Mental Health Bill will lead to more people being sectioned. Simeon Brody talks to three people who know the reality of compulsory treatment.


Posted: 28 July 2005 | Full Article


Courts fail to uphold human rights of all social care clients


People using contracted-out social care services are not having their human rights upheld, according to a leading think-tank, writes Mithran Samuel.


Posted: 22 July 2005 | Full Article


Curfews for under-16s breach human rights, the High Court rules


The High Court has ruled that police powers to impose curfews on under-16s breach the European Convention on Human Rights, writes Lindsay Clark.


Posted: 20 July 2005 | Full Article


Register open to refugee groups


A national register of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children will go live later this month, three months later than first planned.


Posted: 07 July 2005 | Full Article


Less monitoring - more support


A register to monitor personal assistants for disabled people would be a step backwards, argues Alan Desborough


Posted: 07 July 2005 | Full Article


GMC joins Mental Health Alliance


The General Medical Council has joined the Mental Health Alliance, a coalition campaigning against government plans to extend compulsory treatment for people with mental health problems writes Simeon Brody .


Posted: 05 July 2005 | Full Article


Shops targeted by 'hoodie' protest


A group of "hoodie" -clad young people gathered outside a shopping centre last week to protest against its ban on the garment


Posted: 30 June 2005 | Full Article


Sex guidelines may 'breach privacy law'


An investigation is to be launched into whether the London Child Protection Committee's guidance on professionals working with sexually active children infringes privacy laws.


Posted: 30 June 2005 | Full Article


My practice


Victims of crime need support but often their plight is made worse by the way they are treated afterwards, says Joanna Perry .


Posted: 30 June 2005 | Full Article


Attitude to hoodies 'is politics of fear'


The leader of the country's largest trade union has accused the government of playing on the "dark politics of fear" in relation to young people since its re-election. General secretary Dave Prentis told Unison's annual conference in Glasgow last week that the government was tarnishing young people by targeting those wearing hooded tops and suggesting young offenders wear "work gang jackets". He also renewed the union's threat to call out its members on strike to defend public sector pensions. Prentis said: "We will fight for pensions that give dignity and security to all our members in retirement." Deputy prime minister John Prescott avoided a 24-hour national strike by council staff by promising to revoke proposed reforms that would increase the minimum pension age from 50 to 55 and the normal retirement age from 60 to 65. Unison expects the changes to be revoked soon, but it has insisted that


Posted: 30 June 2005 | Full Article


Adoptive parents seek more support


Prospective parents will turn their backs on adoption unless they receive better support, a conference has heard.


Posted: 23 June 2005 | Full Article


New legislation could face challenges under Human Rights Act


New legislation which changes the criteria allowing courts to have children adopted without their parents consent could face multiple legal challenges, a barrister has warned today at a conference, writes Simeon Brody from Norwich .


Posted: 16 June 2005 | Full Article


Ruling increases smacking pressure


The UK is lagging behind many other European countries by not banning smacking, an alliance of children's charities claimed this week following a landmark ruling.


Posted: 16 June 2005 | Full Article


Commission flags equality agenda


The Disability Rights Commission has launched a debate on the future of equality for disabled people in Britain.


Posted: 16 June 2005 | Full Article


Human rights rap for government


Europe's human rights chief has slammed the government's use of antisocial behaviour orders and treatment of young offenders, asylum seekers and travellers.


Posted: 16 June 2005 | Full Article


UK lags behind European counterparts with smacking laws

The UK is lagging behind more than a third of other European countries by not banning smacking, an alliance of children’s charities claimed this week following a landmark ruling, writes Amy Taylor .


Posted: 10 June 2005 | Full Article


Commissioner for human rights slams UK's asylum system


The UK’s track record on the detention of children, the asylum system and use of antisocial behaviour orders was today slammed by the commissioner for human rights following his visit to the UK last November, writes Clare Jerrom .


Posted: 08 June 2005 | Full Article


Blueprint for future of welfare revealed


The welfare system should be reformed to help disabled people design and deliver their own services, according to new research.


Posted: 02 June 2005 | Full Article


Plymouth avoids child death inquiry


Plymouth Council has won a High Court battle to prevent an inquiry into its role in the death of a baby whose mother was jailed for cruelty.


Posted: 02 June 2005 | Full Article


Call to rethink views on disabled foetuses


The practice of aborting foetuses because they are disabled is akin to terminating pregnancies on the grounds of race or gender, a campaigner told delegates.


Posted: 26 May 2005 | Full Article


Status of child protection at removal centre alarms prison chief inspector


Safeguarding arrangements for asylum seeker children detained at Dungavel immigration removal centre in Scotland remain inadequate, more than two years after the chief inspector of prisons made a series of recommendations on how they should be improved.


Posted: 19 May 2005 | Full Article


Sector considers Labour's third term


Tony Blair has led Labour to a third straight election victory but with a greatly reduced majority and the loss of key ministers in education and health, writes Amy Taylor


Posted: 06 May 2005 | Full Article


Call for action on child detention


A UK-wide approach to ending the detention of asylum seeking children is needed, Scottish children's commissioner Kathleen Marshall has said.


Posted: 05 May 2005 | Full Article


Scottish commissioner calls for an end to detaining asylum seeking children


A UK-wide approach to ending the detention of asylum seeking children is needed, according to the Scottish children’s commissioner Kathleen Marshall, writes Derren Hayes .


Posted: 29 April 2005 | Full Article


Needle exchange inmate may appeal


A prisoner may appeal after his application for a judicial review to introduce a needle exchange in the prison service was refused.


Posted: 28 April 2005 | Full Article


Government violates Geneva Convention


The government is violating the Geneva Convention by deporting asylum seekers whose claims have failed to warring and dangerous countries, according to a report published yesterday, writes Amy Taylor .


Posted: 12 April 2005 | Full Article


MPs sound warning on travellers policy


Government policy on gypsies and travellers could breach international human rights law, MPs and peers warned last week.


Posted: 07 April 2005 | Full Article


New safeguards on incapacity planned


People who lack the capacity to object to being detained in psychiatric hospitals or care homes would have their rights protected under new measures proposed by the government.


Posted: 07 April 2005 | Full Article


Marriage guidance


The Foreign Office is working with social services to deal with the issue of forced marriages. Hannah Miller and Vinay Talwar highlight good practice and expose some of the misconceptions that surround this area.


Posted: 31 March 2005 | Full Article


Tories' traveller policies 'spurious'


Conservative policies to tackle illegal traveller camps are "spurious" and may exacerbate the problem, say campaigners.


Posted: 24 March 2005 | Full Article


Read the Rights Act


Four years after the Human Rights Act 1998 came into force, research shows that organisations are still not aware of its duties particularly regarding people with learning difficulties, write Patricia Finnegan and Stephen Clarke.


Posted: 10 March 2005 | Full Article


Forced testing may breach human rights


Powers in the Drugs Bill to compulsorily test offenders for drugs at the point of arrest and enforce intervention orders could contravene human rights laws, MPs and peers have warned.


Posted: 24 February 2005 | Full Article


Compulsory drug testing could breach human rights legislation


Compulsory drug testing offenders on arrest and measures to enforce intervention orders included in the Drugs Bill may breach European human rights legislation, writes Sally Gillen .


Posted: 23 February 2005 | Full Article


THE ETHICS OF WELFARE: HUMAN RIGHTS, DEPENDENCY AND RESPONSIBILITY


This journey explores themes such as definitions and interpretations of human rights, cultural concepts of different perceived types of citizen, and the Third Way political orthodoxy (which is described deliciously as "ethically deficient"), writes Ashling Sans.


Posted: 17 February 2005 | Full Article


Public will examine main centre's work


The government is to be invited to give evidence to an inquiry into the services and facilities at the main processing centre for asylum applications.


Posted: 17 February 2005 | Full Article


A poisonous form of modern slavery


We will all pay for agencies' exploitation of vulnerable people working in key sectors, writes Yvonne Roberts.

Posted: 10 February 2005 | Full Article


Special report on the government's five-year asylum plan


The government’s five-year strategy for tackling asylum launched by Charles Clarke (pictured) this week proved to be the latest in a string of punitive measures designed to make Britain “unattractive” to would-be refugees, but which could place these vulnerable people at risk, writes Anabel Unity Sale .


Posted: 09 February 2005 | Full Article


Fears raised that schools will not be covered by disability bill


Fears that schools may not be covered by a major duty in the Disability Discrimination Bill were raised at Community Care Live Children and Families, writes Amy Taylor .


Posted: 09 February 2005 | Full Article


London prisons at time of Mubarek's death were a "nightmare"


Prisons in London were a “nightmare” at the time of Zahid Mubarek’s murder, former director general of the Prison Service Martin Narey said today, writes Maria Ahmed .


Posted: 08 February 2005 | Full Article


November 2004


Tidy error! Bulletin No 82 Butterworths Family and Child Law Bulletin – November 2004 Bulletin Editor Jonathan Montgomery, BA, LLM Professor of Law, University of Southampton Butterworths Family and Child Law Bulletin provides an immediate updating service for the main text of Butterworths Family Law Service and Clarke Hall and Morrison on Children . The Bulletin is published every month and sent to subscribers to those publications. References to BFLS and CHM above


Posted: 08 February 2005 | Full Article


The "Bournewood" Case


The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) recently gave judgment in HL v United Kingdom –the “Bournewood” case.


Posted: 07 February 2005 | Full Article


Owers: Staff broke inmates' bones


Young prisoners' bones were broken as they were forcibly strip-searched by staff at Hindley Young Offender Institution, the chief inspector of prisons has said.


Posted: 03 February 2005 | Full Article


Charities protest against proposed cut in free mental health aftercare


Charities have registered alarm at the prospect of a cut in the availability of free aftercare for discharged mental health patients to just six weeks under the draft Mental Health Bill.


Posted: 03 February 2005 | Full Article


Natural Selection?


Social care is seen as female-oriented, yet those who head its organisations are usually male. Anabel Unity Sale investigates and talks to three high-flying women in the sector.


Posted: 03 February 2005 | Full Article


Stuck in the steam age


Our railway system remains practically inaccessible for disabled people writes Jennifer Phillips.


Posted: 03 February 2005 | Full Article


Professionals urged to go back to basics


The head of the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service warned professionals last week against getting "bogged down" with information.


Posted: 03 February 2005 | Full Article


Stripped of dignity


Last year, during research for our campaign calling for a reduction in the number of young people in custody and improvements in the treatment of those in custody, we discovered that young people were being held in "special cells". Here, disruptive young offenders were strip-searched and held in segregation.


Posted: 03 February 2005 | Full Article


Concern raised over training in children's homes


Lord Filkin, parliamentary under secretary of state for children and families, indicated today that he is concerned about the standard of staff training in some children’s homes, writes Amy Taylor .


Posted: 01 February 2005 | Full Article


Detention risk in Mental Health Bill


Campaigners have welcomed as a "victory" steps in the Drugs Bill to scrap measures that put care staff working with drug abusers at risk of prosecution.


Posted: 27 January 2005 | Full Article


Scotland The Brave


The Scottish parliament did not bow to a tabloid agenda with its Mental Health Act, unlike its counterpart in England, where fear of crime appears to be a dominant factor, says Peter Beresford.


Posted: 27 January 2005 | Full Article


Committee repeats calls for Mental Capacity Bill to be amended


A parliamentary committee has repeated calls for the government to amend the Mental Capacity Bill to prevent the unlawful detention of people who lack the capacity to resist, writes Mithran Samuel .


Posted: 24 January 2005 | Full Article


Debate on Freedom of Information Act


We asked:- Do you think the Freedom of Information Act will result in a mountain of paper work? Would that be a price worth paying? click here


Posted: 21 January 2005 | Full Article


Free to criticise Iran?


Having survived bigotry in Iran, Nasrin Parvaz reflects on the meaning of "freedom of speech" in the UK.


Posted: 20 January 2005 | Full Article


Figures of hate


Recognition of the scale of hate crime is growing fast. The challenge, says Peter Dunn, is to fashion support services for the range of victims.


Posted: 20 January 2005 | Full Article


Patient wins right to bypass relative


A woman with a 20-year history of mental health problems has won a test case to prevent her sister having a say on whether she should be admitted to hospital.


Posted: 20 January 2005 | Full Article


The Big Question


Should people be tested for their suitability as parents before undergoing fertility treatment?


Posted: 20 January 2005 | Full Article


Healing the wounds


As aid is rushed to South East Asia, thought must be given to how to provide long-term help for traumatised people across the globe. Shaun Collins reports on the lessons of his work with victims of war in West Africa.


Posted: 20 January 2005 | Full Article


Don't let media dictate policies


Government measures for disabled people are undermined by its pandering to prejudices, writes John Knight.


Posted: 20 January 2005 | Full Article


Demand for basic rights in draft bill


Radical changes must be made to the draft Mental Health Bill if it is to deliver improvements in services, according to a charity.


Posted: 20 January 2005 | Full Article


Owers expresses concern at use of force and segregation at Chelmsford


Chief inspector of prisons Anne Owers has expressed concern over increased use of force and segregation at Chelmsford prison and young offender institution, in an inspection report published today, writes Maria Ahmed .


Posted: 13 January 2005 | Full Article


Exclusive: Home Office fails to honour pledge of assessments for detained children


No welfare assessments of children detained in an immigration removal centre have taken place more than a year after the government announced the policy, Community Care has learned, writes Amy Taylor .


Posted: 13 January 2005 | Full Article


Review of Labour's policies singles out asylum seekers' poor treatment


Policies introduced since Labour came to power in 1997 have helped make asylum seekers the most socially excluded group in the UK, according to a report published this week.


Posted: 13 January 2005 | Full Article


Cry Freedom


It is no longer good enough merely to cite confidentiality if a member of the public wants information from an organisation - they can now demand it as a legal right. Heather Brooke looks at how the Freedom of Information Act will work.


Posted: 13 January 2005 | Full Article


The Simon Heng column


At the moment, I have no thoughts about ending it all; I have worked too hard both to survive and to have a reasonable quality of life.


Posted: 13 January 2005 | Full Article


Views sought on unlawful detention


Consultation on changes to the Mental Capacity Bill to safeguard people who lack capacity against being unlawfully detained will begin soon.


Posted: 13 January 2005 | Full Article


Cannings will not receive compensation for wrongful imprisonment


A mother wrongly imprisoned for the murder of her two baby sons has said she will not receive any compensation from the government, writes Mithran Samuel .


Posted: 11 January 2005 | Full Article


The Golly in the Cupboard


Phil Frampton has a story to tell. Abandoned as a child and brought up in Barnardo's homes mainly because his mother was white and his father wasn't, he later fought to gain access to a file that had for 40 years existed without his knowledge, writes Graham Hopkins.


Posted: 06 January 2005 | Full Article


The Simon Heng column


But what if I don't respect someone's beliefs or practices? What if someone else's beliefs are actually contrary to the idea of diversity?


Posted: 06 January 2005 | Full Article


Child prisoners win right to be heard


Child prisoners win right to be heard Children in prison will be given the right to argue against being placed in solitary confinement following an appeal court judgement last month.


Posted: 06 January 2005 | Full Article